Wests Tigers missing Robbie Farah and referees' 50-50 calls

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willow
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Wests Tigers missing Robbie Farah and referees' 50-50 calls

Post by willow » Wed 15 Jul, 2015 7:51 am

Wests Tigers missing Robbie Farah and referees' 50-50 calls

Date: July 13, 2015
Daniel Lane

Wests Tigers skipper Robbie Farah believes the club's standing on the premiership ladder – they're equal last with Newcastle – isn't helping their cause when referee's make 50-50 calls.

In a blow for Wests Tigers, the shoulder Farah injured in the first State of Origin match, and the broken hand that kept him out of the Origin decider, is expected to sideline him from Sunday's match against top-of-the-table Brisbane.

However, he suggested the club's inexperienced squad is suffering when it came to line-ball calls, describing their last-start loss to Parramatta – when they lost the penalty count 12-4 – as "frustrating".

"I thought the boys played really well," Farah said. "I thought our commitment, our effort, was great. We were unlucky with some certain things in the second half, a few soft tries, but we weren't helped by some certain things that went on out there."

Champion Data statistics noted Wests Tigers has conceded 126 penalties to 105. They've won the penalty count three times; drawn on three occasions and lost 11. When asked for his view, Farah agreed it seemed the 50-50 calls were a problem teams at the bottom of the ladder had to contend with.

"It seems to be the way it's been happening to us," said Farah. "It's not an excuse but it doesn't make your job any easier when those calls go against you.

"You're battling for confidence, you're battling to win footy games and to compound that you get some calls that go against you ... that makes things difficult."

When asked if coach Jason Taylor had spoken to referees boss Tony Archer he simply said, "I hope so".

Farah said the Tigers hadn't given up hope of making a late run on a congested ladder, despite having a tough run against Brisbane, the Roosters, Melbourne and Canberra.

"No-one likes sitting equal last," he said. "We have one eye on the semis, as improbable as it may be, we're still a chance. Where we're sitting at the moment isn't nice and I'd like to get back as quick as I can to try and help us climb the ladder."

Farah said he'd increase the load on his broken hand throughout the week but his shoulder injury was also a problem.

"It's touch and go, my physio has already told me not to even try to convince him to play," he said. "They want to make sure I'm 100 per cent when I get back. I'm still battling a shoulder injury as well. I'll see how I go during the week and if I'm a chance I'll keep nagging him to try and change his mind."

Farah said injuries to key players and the loss of him and prop Aaron Woods to NSW during the Origin series hadn't helped the club. However, he's urged for greater consistency starting on Sunday in a game he expected no-one would give the Tigers any hope of winning.

"Obviously a tough game, they're playing great footy," he said. "I'm sure no-one will give us a chance but we have to prepare well, go up confident. We haven't been getting the results but if we continue to work the way we have at training I'm sure [they'll come].

"We've had some good wins but we've also had some disappointing losses mixed in with that, consistency is something we've been striving for."

Meanwhile, Farah said the crushing 52-6 defeat the Blues suffered in the Origin decider did not make the talk of the rise of NSW meaningless.

"I don't think so, next year is a new year," he said. "We have to cop it, whatever criticism we get is deserved. We've got to wait 12 months to try and rectify that."


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Post by innsaneink » Wed 15 Jul, 2015 1:07 pm

Ricky Stuart
The Sunday Telegraph
May 27, 2012 12:00AM




ANYBODY who saw Bill Harrigan's explanation for allowing the Greg Inglis try in yesterday's Daily Telegraph will know what I am talking about when I say it's difficult talking to the man - it's hard to get a concrete answer from him.

His explanations come in riddles. He's never wrong. You never walk out with any meaningful outcome.

Even when you're convinced you're right, with the understanding of a game you've spent more than 30 years playing and coaching, he hits you with all this jargon and convoluted explanations detailing why he's right and you're wrong.

You end up more confused than ever. No wonder so many NRL coaches are either struggling with him or, by now, have given up on him.

Three weeks ago, Canberra coach David Furner was fined for saying the referees go into the game with a preconceived idea of what the outcome might be and referee accordingly.

He was fined because it broke the rules, but I don't think he was saying the referees were cheating.

The referees first denied this and later justified it, but we know they arm themselves with tip sheets on each team, and the obvious outcome of that is they must go into a game with a preconceived idea of how teams play - that's the purpose of tip sheets.

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Post by TrueTiger » Wed 15 Jul, 2015 2:44 pm

I wish he would throw the tip sheets out the window and let the refs referee the game thats infront of them as it is being played..surely this would be the most honest and fair way,dont you think???
You may see me struggle...but you will never see me quit... :D

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Post by Flippedy » Wed 15 Jul, 2015 5:59 pm

When asked for his view, Farah agreed it seemed the 50-50 calls were a problem teams at the bottom of the ladder had to contend with.


My question is - why is this so? Why do the bottom teams lose out with the 50-50 calls all the time? If anything, I reckon it should be the other way around to give the underdogs a chance and make the games more competitive. Or better still, just ref the games fairly and have no bloody bias whatsoever! Now there's a novel idea!

The whole concept that bottom placed teams are refereed more harshly than the top and middle placed teams is just plain wrong, and it should not be just accepted the way it is now.
Sooner or later, next year has to be this year - Ricksen

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Post by BornBlack&Gold » Wed 15 Jul, 2015 6:08 pm

innsaneink wrote:Ricky Stuart
The Sunday Telegraph
May 27, 2012 12:00AM




ANYBODY who saw Bill Harrigan's explanation for allowing the Greg Inglis try in yesterday's Daily Telegraph will know what I am talking about when I say it's difficult talking to the man - it's hard to get a concrete answer from him.

His explanations come in riddles. He's never wrong. You never walk out with any meaningful outcome.

Even when you're convinced you're right, with the understanding of a game you've spent more than 30 years playing and coaching, he hits you with all this jargon and convoluted explanations detailing why he's right and you're wrong.

You end up more confused than ever. No wonder so many NRL coaches are either struggling with him or, by now, have given up on him.

Three weeks ago, Canberra coach David Furner was fined for saying the referees go into the game with a preconceived idea of what the outcome might be and referee accordingly.

He was fined because it broke the rules, but I don't think he was saying the referees were cheating.

The referees first denied this and later justified it, but we know they arm themselves with tip sheets on each team, and the obvious outcome of that is they must go into a game with a preconceived idea of how teams play - that's the purpose of tip sheets.
Yep, bill harrigan brought in the tip sheet idea, his 'style' as a ref is how the nrl train them to be nowadays. He revolutionised rubgy league referreeing - just ask him :roll:


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Post by TIGER » Fri 17 Jul, 2015 6:10 pm

If anyone thinks referees deliberately penalise teams due to their position on the ladder they are kidding!! The reason why teams are down there is because they aren't good enough when your struggling to compete you try to push the rules to stay in touch which results in being penalised which snowballs into doing more work to stay in touch eventually you get down on the scoreboard and the cycle continues. Top sides don't concede these types of penalties because they're dominating play most of the time.

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Post by cktiger » Sat 18 Jul, 2015 10:15 pm

TIGER wrote:If anyone thinks referees deliberately penalise teams due to their position on the ladder they are kidding!! The reason why teams are down there is because they aren't good enough when your struggling to compete you try to push the rules to stay in touch which results in being penalised which snowballs into doing more work to stay in touch eventually you get down on the scoreboard and the cycle continues. Top sides don't concede these types of penalties because they're dominating play most of the time.
They may not do it deliberately but they sure do it unconsciously.
Same goes for the "so called" elite players who continually get penalties awarded by complaining about other teams slowing them down all the while getting away with walking off the mark and other illegalities.

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