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Post by willow » Sun 29 Apr, 2012 8:04 pm

WESTS TIGERS BEAT EELS 31-30 IN NRL
By Wayne Cousins
29/04/2012 6:06:43 PM

Wests Tigers recorded a 31-30 victory over Parramatta Eels at Parramatta Stadium today in round 8 of the Telstra Premiership.

In front of a crowd of 19, 654, Wests Tigers dominated the first half to lead 19-0 at half-time before the Eels rattled off five tries in 13 minutes late in the game.

Parramatta half-back Casey McGuire was placed on report in the 7th minute for a forearm shot on Wests Tigers full-back Tim Moltzen after he defused a towering bomb. Moltzen left the field with centre Blake Ayshford coming on.

Wests Tigers opened the scoring in the 11th minute when hooker and captain Robbie Farah scooted out from dummy half to his left before turning a ball back inside for centre Chris Lawrence to score behind the posts for his first club try of the season. Five-eighth Benji Marshall converted the try for a 6-0 lead.

Wests Tigers winger Beau Ryan then produced one of his now trademark short grubber kicks behind the defence 10 metres out from the tryline to dive on the ball to score in the 20th minute for a 10-0 lead. Marshall failed to convert the try.

A beautiful short offload by young prop Matt Groat to prop Ray Cashmere saw the ball kept alive before second-rower Liam Fulton went left to splice through one defender in a 25 metre run to score next to the posts in the 26th minute.
Marshall converted the try for a 16-0 lead.

McGuire was placed on report for a second time in the 29th minute when collared Farah high around the neck. Farah left the field.

A minute later, Parramatta second-rower Joseph Paulo was penalised for a tackle high around the head of Marshall. Moltzen stepped up to convert the penalty goal from next to the posts to give Wests Tigers an 18-0 lead after 31 minutes. Farah returned to the field in the 35th minute.

Marshall kicked a field goal from 15 metres out inside the final minute of half-time to give Wests Tigers a 19-0 lead at the break.
2nd Half

The first 15 minutes of the second half saw Wests Tigers remain committed in defence.

Parramatta forward Fuifui Moimoi was denied a try in the 57th minute for a double movement.

A minute later, a towering bomb by Marshall saw Wests Tigers forward Ben Murdoch-Masila catch the bomb in front of full-back Jarryd Hayne to race 20 metres to score a fine try. Marshall converted the try to give Wests Tigers a 25-0 lead after 59 minutes.

Former Balmain Ryde Eastwood Tigers player Matthew Ryan crossed for the Eels’ first try in the 67th minute when he brushed off Lawrence in a 10 metre run to score out wide. Winger Luke Burt converted the try from the sideline for a 31-6 scoreline.

Three minutes later, Parramatta centre Willie Tonga dived over for a try out wide after the Wests Tigers were caught short with numbers. Burt converted the try for a 31-12 scoreline after 72 minutes.

Parramatta then rattled off three consecutive tries in the final eight minutes through winger Ken Sio, Hayne, and centre Cheyse Blair. Burt converted all three tries but the siren beat the Eels in the end.


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Post by willow » Sun 29 Apr, 2012 8:05 pm

Sheens blasts Tigers despite win over Eels
Joe Barton
April 29, 2012 - 6:39PM

AAP

Wests Tigers coach Tim Sheens labelled his team's 31-30 NRL victory over Parramatta on Sunday as rubbish after the Tigers conceded 30 unanswered points in the final 13 minutes of the match.

The Tigers were on track for consecutive shutouts, after defeating Penrith 30-0 last round, until unheralded Eels prop Matt Ryan scored in the 67th minute to give the inexplicably loyal crowd something to cheer about.

That try sparked a landslide as Parramatta piled on four more tries through Willie Tonga, Ken Sio, Jarryd Hayne and finally Cheyse Blair in the 80th minute - all of which were converted by the recalled Luke Burt.

Not to mention the disallowed tries to Fuifui Moimoi and Sio in that same period.

And while it meant the last placed-Eels drew to within one point by the fulltime whistle, it could do nothing to stop them falling to their seventh loss of the season.

Yet it was Sheens who was the more ropeable coach after the match, admitting his men clocked off - and were lucky to get home courtesy of a Benji Marshall field goal before the halftime break.

"We were very disappointed - 31-0 with 14 minutes to go and you let them score and get within a point," Sheens said.

"It's just rubbish.

"The only positive is the win.

"... It was attitude, for sure. We just clocked off - there's no doubt."

The Tigers were on cruise control, going ahead with first-half tries to Chris Lawrence, Beau Ryan and Liam Fulton, before a second-half double to bench forward Ben Murdoch-Masila looked to have ended the game with 20 minutes to play.

"Nonetheless, we look at the first 60-odd minutes and know we did something good, and played well and looked like some sort of a premiership side," Sheens said.

"The last part of it, we looked like an A-Grade side."

Tigers skipper Robbie Farah, who set up Lawrence's first try with a clever inside ball, was equally frustrated: "We had an opportunity there to post two 30-0 wins consecutively, which would've been great to get our season underway.

"We just let that slip now. There's a lot of work to be done."

Parramatta hooker Matt Keating said the team needed to look past the loss and take the positive from their unlikely fightback into Friday night's clash with Canterbury.

"It makes you realise you've got to play for 80," he said.

"We have to take confidence out of that last 20-minute block and take it into Friday night against the Dogs."

The Eels were without star recruit Chris Sandow, who was dropped by coach Stephen Kearney to lower grade side Wentworthville, but watched the game from the sideline.

His replacement, Casey McGuire, had a forgettable afternoon and was on report twice - for high tackles on Tim Moltzen and Farah - while teammate Mitchell Allgood was on report for a high shot on Benji Marshall.

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Post by Knuckles » Sun 29 Apr, 2012 9:09 pm

In fairness, I think some credit should go to the Eels in that they could have thrown the towel in but didn't.
I hope for them a win is just around the corner ...vwill be cheering for them against the Bulldogs next week.

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Post by willow » Mon 30 Apr, 2012 6:07 am

Coaches left snookered after Tigers rack the cue with 15 to go
Michael Chammas
April 29, 2012


IT WAS hard to determine who was more frustrated, Tim Sheens or Stephen Kearney, after they witnessed a bizarre ending to the match at Parramatta Stadium yesterday afternoon.

Sheens was furious with his team's late-match capitulation, in which they conceded 30 points in 14 minutes, dropping an F-bomb in the post-match press conference. ''I'm f---ing … Oh,'' Sheens said as he tried to express his disappointment.

Robbie Farah saw the funny side of it, as he chuckled away alongside his red-faced coach, but there was nothing funny about the way the Tigers finished the match. They put the cue in the rack when they had the opportunity to bury Parramatta and send out a clear warning to rival clubs, angering the veteran coach.

''31-0 with 14 minutes to go and you let them score and get within a point and have one disallowed - two disallowed … it's rubbish,'' Sheens said. ''The positive is the win.''

The Tigers looked on track to rack up their second consecutive win without conceding a point, something the joint-venture had never achieved before their round-seven win against Penrith a fortnight ago.

It's a lapse of concentration that could come back to bite the Tigers at the back end of the year, especially if it comes down to for-and-against, with Farah admitting his team was guilty of clocking off.

''We had an opportunity to post two 30-0 wins consecutively, which would have been great to get our season under way and, points-wise, entrench us right in the middle there,'' Farah said. ''We let that slip now and there's a lot of work to be done. I think at 31-0 with 13 to go you probably start looking at the clock and thinking, 'Here we go, we've got the cue in the rack', but with a team like Parra and with guys like Jarryd Hayne, they just grow a leg and start offloading and start playing touch footy on us and it felt like we were in quicksand, but we definitely didn't help our own cause.''

For Kearney, it was an all-too-familiar feeling trying to come up with some positives following yet another loss. The final 14 minutes certainly provided Eels fans - and Kearney for that matter - with a glimpse of hope heading into Friday night's clash against Canterbury at ANZ Stadium. But Kearney lamented his team's start to the game, critical of their ball control.

''I think it was something like 53 per cent completions on our part in the first half, and you just put too much pressure on yourselves,'' he said. ''We had a couple of opportunities in that first half - Benny [Roberts] dropped the ball and Reni [Maitua] had an opportunity as well. We had some opportunities there, but that 20-minute rally, for me it did [camouflage the rest of the game].''

Nathan Hindmarsh, who up until this season was playing 80 minutes every game, has had his game-time cut dramatically this year.

While he admitted he preferred to remain on the field for the entire game, he's willing to do what it takes if it's the best thing for the team.

''I could have had longer but that's they way they used the interchange,'' he said. ''It was a bit weird today - because usually around the 60-minute mark I come off - I was sitting beside Timmy Mannah saying, 'So this is what the front-rowers do, play for 20 minutes, wait for a while and go back on again.'

''As long as we start winning games, I can play 10 minutes. I've come to that conclusion that as long as I'm out there contributing in some way, I'll play as many minutes as they want me to play.''

Tigers prop Aaron Woods is firming with each match as an Origin bolter, starring for the Tigers in the one-point win.

''He's going forward in leaps and bounds, that young lad,'' Sheens said. ''He played against Mannah and company today and I didn't think he lost anything by that.

''He's only young, whether they use him or not use him this year, he's headed that way for sure … I think he's got rep footy written all over him.''

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Post by willow » Mon 30 Apr, 2012 6:08 am

A team's work is never done, not this season
Greg Prichard
April 30, 2012

You dominate a game, score five tries in building a 31-point lead, and you don't let the opposition score until the 67th minute - yet you're kicking yourself at full-time even though you've won. Welcome to the latest instalment in the series of strange happenings in the NRL this season.

How it happened, you can be pretty sure: Wests Tigers clocked off, and Parramatta, being the type of team that get excited when they sense the opposition dropping off and feel some extra room in which to move, started throwing the ball about and racking up points.

A lead of 31-0 became 31-6, and then 31-12. Surely now, the Tigers will tighten up again and not concede any more late tries that will only earn a rebuke from coach Tim Sheens. But then it becomes 31-18, and 31-24. Now, it is embarrassing, and while the clock was always on the side of the Tigers, it must have been an awful feeling to concede yet another try with 20 seconds to go.

That field goal from Tigers five-eighth Benji Marshall just before half-time sure came in handy, didn't it?

Sheens let rip with some choice language at the start of the post-match media conference, as he talked about what he had just seen. Who knows, he may have dropped a few more F-bombs in the dressing room immediately beforehand and remained on auto-pilot. Whatever the case, you could understand his frustration. Not swearing in a situation like this is for Mother Teresa.

''We look at the first 60-odd minutes and know we did something good, and played well and looked like a premiership side, and the last part of it we looked like an A-grade side,'' Sheens said.

Speaking of A-grade sides, or at least NSW Cup sides - which may be a considerable step up from A-grade but still a significant comedown from first grade - that's where Parramatta's usual halfback, Chris Sandow, was playing on the weekend for Wentworthville when, ideally, he should have been probing for holes in the Tigers' defence.

Sandow was recruited from South Sydney for an incredible $550,000 per season, but has been out of form and low on confidence. He was sent back to Parramatta's feeder club to try to spark his game, but the Sandow situation is just one of many problems for the Eels. They miss too many tackles, they turn over too much ball and unless Jarryd Hayne is firing they aren't nearly dynamic enough in attack.

''The damage was done when, one, we didn't make the tackles we should have in the first half, and, two, you turn over half your possession,'' Parramatta coach Stephen Kearney said.

In the absence of Sandow, it was up to five-eighth Ben Roberts to try to get something going in the halves for the Eels, but he couldn't make it happen. Midway through the first half, with Parramatta only 6-0 down, Roberts broke into the clear, but as he galloped away his thigh bumped the ball out of his hand and a possible try went begging. He's a rocks and diamonds sort of player.

Kearney said he was yet to decide whether to restore Sandow to the team for Friday night's game against Canterbury at ANZ Stadium, but, really, he has to. It was Kearney who brought him to the club, and it's his job to get him firing.

The Parramatta players spent almost as much time in a huddle on the field after the match as they had in the whirlwind period during which they scored five tries. The leaders among them talked about building on their finish to the game, and avoiding the earlier mistakes that got them into trouble. We will find out how hard everyone was listening when they play the Bulldogs.


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Post by willow » Mon 30 Apr, 2012 6:09 am

Sheens' F-bomb doesn't miss - but Kearney should
Richard Hinds
April 30, 2012

"Kearney said the final effort only served to highlight the lacklustre performance that preceded it."

"Kearney said the final effort only served to highlight the lacklustre performance that preceded it." Photo: Getty Images

The winning coach, Tim Sheens, started his post-match press conference with an audible obscenity. The losing coach, Stephen Kearney, was relaxed enough to light-heartedly wonder whether Fuifui Moimoi - who had more chance of hiding his backside in a tutu than concealing his blatant double-movement - actually knew the rule.

Losing Parramatta fans stood and cheered their team from the field. Winning Wests Tigers fans shuffled to the exits as the players began a searching post-mortem on the field.

The postscript to yesterday's western derby was almost as bizarre as the game itself. Or, at least, the final 21 minutes during which Parramatta scored five tries to slash a 31-point deficit to the single, unexpectedly precious field goal Benji Marshall kicked for practice just before half-time.

Incidentally, Sheens had called that field goal from the box. Which, given it bolstered his rampaging team's lead to 19-0 against an opposition side that did not look likely to score another five tries this millennium, seemed a bit like taking out extra home insurance in case of falling space junk.

However, as redeeming as those finals moments might have seemed for Parramatta, you left wondering if they had done anything more than raise the spirits of those supporters who did not leave early to beat the traffic. Whether the Eels, with their futile flurry, had merely produced a more impressive form of camouflage than Manly's Sea Beagles outfit, or Canberra's more traditional combat jersey.

As you would expect, Kearney said the final effort only served to highlight the lacklustre performance that preceded it. Yet, as the pressure builds, he could not help be slightly relieved the late avalanche had taken the sting out of an abject performance. The type upon which harsh judgments can be made in grandstands and in boardrooms.

Indeed, when Ben Murdoch-Masila plunged over to complete a rapid-fire double after 62 minutes, and give Wests Tigers a 31-0 buffer, it seemed Kearney's Eels had also crossed a line. One that, after a season plus eight games of aching disappointment, separates mere under-achievement from outright crisis.

That seemed achingly apparent in the almost morose way in which the Eels had gone about their business. Wests Tigers, with troubles of their own, looked like a team desperate to make something happen. The Eels looked like a team vaguely hoping something would happen - but not too fussed if it didn't.

On a weekend when $550,000-per-season half Chris Sandow played for Wentworthville, it was the performance of five-eighth Ben Roberts that was symbolic of the Eels' lacklustre first 60 minutes. Once, having cut through the Tigers' defence, Roberts decided to kick the ball and let it hit the ground when he did. Later, he threw one pass so far forward he might well be nominated in the next NFL draft.

Before the match, two state government ministers had promoted a mental health initiative for the western suburbs. Without being flippant about their cause, errors like these were sure to do any Eels' fans head in. Of course, Roberts's blunders could at least be justified on the basis he was at least in the position to make them. Jarryd Hayne, the square peg in the round Origin hole, seemed on the comatose side of laconic. The honourable Nathan Hindmarsh was spared humiliation by long stints on the bench. And Moimoi, the irresistible force of the Parramatta grand final team of - can you believe it - just 2½ years ago, had assumed curious cult-figure status, drawing loud cheers for ineffectual runs at the Wests Tigers defence.

The result was that Wests Tigers had a virtual nets session, with Marshall and Robbie Farah wandering unmolested across the ruck, their forwards hammering holes in a balsa wood defence and Lote Tuqiri prowling threateningly on the wing. Just the type of confidence booster the dethroned premiership favourites needed. Even the last 22 minutes, which they spent mentally back in the sheds, might prove useful, providing ammunition for the clearly displeased Sheens.

The Eels? The most optimistic assessment was that final flurry had instilled missing confidence. That, sooner or later, Sandow would return to a team with its attacking instincts sharpened and things would gradually change.

The more realistic judgment? That if there is not drastic improvement, when the club's absent recruit Will Hopoate arrives he will find it easier to convince non-believers Jesus was more than just a great guy with some awesome party tricks, than he will to lift the Eels off the floor.

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Post by willow » Mon 30 Apr, 2012 6:11 am

Five things we learnt from yesterday's game
Greg Prichard
April 30, 2012


1. Parramatta just don't get it.

The Eels didn't get their act together until the game was inside the last 15 minutes, and the Tigers had established a 31-0 lead. You can only take so much out of scoring five tries in 13 minutes when it is too late to do enough to actually win the game and the opposition has clocked off. Even in this wacky competition, a win from where the Eels were is impossible.


2. Fuifui Moimoi is not a happy chap.


Surely the cult figure that is the Eels prop knows the double movement rule, so when he crashed to the ground in a tackle and was prevented from reaching the line by a goalpost, only to get up on his knees and slam the ball over the line anyway, it had to be a clear sign of frustration at how the season is going for Parramatta. Or that he really doesn't know the rule.


3. The Eels need more from Jarryd Hayne.

The Parramatta fullback is a great player, and he has carried the team to victory plenty of times in the past. Sometimes it has seemed unfair to load him with such a burden and expect him to drag the team out of the mire, but they need his genius more than ever now. If Parramatta are to do anything this season - and it seems a huge ''if'' - then Hayne has to regularly play like the superstar he is when at his best.


4. Aaron Woods will play a lot of State of Origin football.

Whether he breaks into the NSW team this year or not remains to be seen, but the 21-year-old prop will get there eventually - and when he does, he is likely to stay. The City representative was terrific yesterday, motivating his coach, Tim Sheens, to say: ''He's going forward in leaps and bounds, that young lad. He played against [Tim] Mannah and company today and I didn't think he lost anything by that. He's headed that way for sure. All things being equal, and injury and other things don't affect it, I think he's got rep footy written all over him.''


5. The nudie run is out for Ben Murdoch-Masila.

Two tries for the Tigers from the bench forward means he won't have to pay the traditional penalty for those players who go through the season without scoring any - and it's only round eight.

Greg Prichard

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Post by cunno » Mon 30 Apr, 2012 6:17 am

Interesting article a bit like eating fairy floss.

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