PLAYERS WE COULD BRING BACK

Wests Tigers State Cup Discussion
gallagher
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Re: PLAYERS WE COULD BRING BACK

Post by gallagher » Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:33 am

steve-o wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 9:21 am
gallagher wrote:
Sun 08 Jul, 2018 4:15 pm
innsaneink wrote:
Sun 08 Jul, 2018 3:49 pm
Austin to Warrington
I can't believe he couldn't find an NRL team.
He’s a one trick pony - as long as you dont fall for his show-and-go, he’s easy to nullify. And his defence is awful. It doesn’t surprise me at all that no NRL club wanted him.
He will rip it up in England though - the faster game over there will suit him perfectly
He has his faults, no doubt. But there are so many players not as good as him in the NRL. Look at our team abed the teams below us.


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Post by steve-o » Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:45 am

gallagher wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:33 am
steve-o wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 9:21 am
gallagher wrote:
Sun 08 Jul, 2018 4:15 pm
innsaneink wrote:
Sun 08 Jul, 2018 3:49 pm
Austin to Warrington
I can't believe he couldn't find an NRL team.
He’s a one trick pony - as long as you dont fall for his show-and-go, he’s easy to nullify. And his defence is awful. It doesn’t surprise me at all that no NRL club wanted him.
He will rip it up in England though - the faster game over there will suit him perfectly
He has his faults, no doubt. But there are so many players not as good as him in the NRL. Look at our team abed the teams below us.
Yeah I would’ve liked to see him transfer to a needy team (eg titans or bulldogs) before the June 30 deadline - could’ve essentially played for a contract while giving those teams a temporary upgrade.
Year of last finals appearance:
2018 - Roosters, Storm, Rabbitohs, Sharks, Panthers, Broncos, Dragons, Warriors
2017 - Eels, Sea Eagles, Cowboys
2016 - Raiders, Bulldogs, Titans
2013 - Knights
2011 - Tigers

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Post by Demps » Mon 09 Jul, 2018 11:48 am

steve-o wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:30 am
Demps wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:00 am
steve-o wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 9:56 am
Value for money agreed. We paid grub way too much. It was a panic signing
Austins asking price is around the same....
However nobody is willing to pay it.
But at least he can put his jersey on without tearing a pec or popping his shoulder out.
$750k pa? No wonder he’s off to England! That’s insane money
Word is Canberra table 800k and he knocked it back.... Thought he was worth more.
Form slumped and raiders withdraw the offer.
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Post by steve-o » Mon 09 Jul, 2018 11:53 am

Demps wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 11:48 am
steve-o wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:30 am
Demps wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 10:00 am
steve-o wrote:
Mon 09 Jul, 2018 9:56 am
Value for money agreed. We paid grub way too much. It was a panic signing
Austins asking price is around the same....
However nobody is willing to pay it.
But at least he can put his jersey on without tearing a pec or popping his shoulder out.
$750k pa? No wonder he’s off to England! That’s insane money
Word is Canberra table 800k and he knocked it back.... Thought he was worth more.
Form slumped and raiders withdraw the offer.
Mitch Rein 2.0
Year of last finals appearance:
2018 - Roosters, Storm, Rabbitohs, Sharks, Panthers, Broncos, Dragons, Warriors
2017 - Eels, Sea Eagles, Cowboys
2016 - Raiders, Bulldogs, Titans
2013 - Knights
2011 - Tigers

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Post by Demps » Sat 25 Aug, 2018 11:36 am

2019 SUPERSTAR ISC SQUAD / DEPTH

1. Delouise Hoeter
2. Kurtis Rowe
3. Tim Simona
4. Connnely Leumelu
5. Lucas Price
6. Tyson Gamble
7. Josh Drinkwater
8. Thomas Mikaele
9. Jacob Liddle (C)
10. Oliver Clarke
11. Josh Aloiai
12. Matt Woods
13. Ray Stone

14. Braden Robson
15. Lamar Leovave
16. Asipeli Fine
17. Russell Packer


Hell yeah! Welcome home boys!
#Unbeatable

"I never lie because I don't fear anyone. You only lie when you're afraid" - John Gotti

Wests Tigers Forum's most brilliant mind.


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Post by Lauren » Fri 16 Nov, 2018 10:53 pm

Only just came across ISP highlights abit earlier and Drinkwater was featured a lot. I admit I only watched 3 games with him in the team and didn't realise how fantastic he was. Anyone know what's happening with him?
Also found this story and thought I'd post - though it's probably already been shared on here.


BIGGEST STORIES | #1 - Drinkwater leaves Wests and wins Challenge Cup
Author
Simon Masterton
NSWRL.com.au
Timestamp
Tue 30 Oct 2018, 09:50 AM
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Looking back on the remarkable year that was, NSWRL.com.au counts down the 10 biggest stories from the 2018 Intrust Super Premiership NSW season. At No.1, a part-time Magpies player packs his bags and wins the Challenge Cup in England.

It’s the Rugby League rollercoaster which took Josh Drinkwater from a Western Sydney construction site to Wembley – and etched the humble halfback’s name in the history books.

In the heat of the 2017-18 Australian summer, Drinkwater was at a crossroads in his promising career. Let go by the Leigh Centurions after their 2017 season ended in relegation, the 26-year-old had returned home and had taken up manual labour, with his Rugby League future unclear. The former Holden Cup star, once viewed as a long-term NRL option at the Dragons and then the Tigers, was digging holes to make a living, getting further away from the football field by the minute.

But digging deep is what the resilient No.7 does best, and a call from Western Suburbs Magpies coach Brett Hodgson changed everything.

“It was tough, mate,” Drinkwater tells NSWRL.com.au. “I spent a lot of time just working, I was willing to get back into footy and luckily enough ‘Hodgo’ gave me a call.

“He knew I played over (in England) and he found out I didn’t have a club, so he gave me a call and I haven’t looked back.”
By mid-February, the recently-rebranded Magpies had found the halfback to lead them into their Intrust Super Premiership NSW return. Fans are all too aware of the display which Drinkwater produced in the seven games that followed.

“I was loving my time at the Magpies at the start of the year,” Drinkwater recalls. “‘Hodgo’ was fantastic for me – from my first day I got there I really got a good part-time squad. He really helped me as a player and I’ve got to give him a lot of credit, to be honest.
“It was tough going back to part-time but he made it so enjoyable and I played my best footy under him. I owe him a lot.”

Drinkwater was unquestionably the competition’s best player in the opening two months, scoring 72 points and setting up 11 tries in the Magpies’ five wins. Still digging holes, still commuting from his Central Coast home and backing up a hard day’s work with training, the Terrigal Sharks junior never lost the hunger for success. A hunger which was about to be satisfied in the most extraordinary way.

The in-form playmaker’s phone rang for a second time; it was Steve McNamara. That’s the man who, just months prior, had coached the Catalans Dragons to a devastating Million Pound Game win over Leigh, sending both the Centurions and their halfback packing. The former England boss needed a replacement for retired halfback Luke Walsh, and Drinkwater was his man.

As much as Magpies fans will attest to Drinkwater’s dominance in the season’s early rounds, those in the northern hemisphere will laud his transformation of the Dragons since his April arrival. Struggling to string wins together in the Super League, the Dragons were celebrated as easy opponents when drawn by stronger teams in the Challenge Cup, but gradually rebuilt their reputation. Drinkwater was central to a mid-season turnaround which would soon deliver French Rugby League its proudest moment.

Proving to offer more than nuisance value throughout the course of the knock-out competition, the Dragons shocked many to book a place in the final at Wembley Stadium. Even then, the chances of the Dragons defeating the Warrington Wolves in the decider – and becoming the first non-British side in the tournament’s 122-year history to claim the famous silverware – were considered slim by many.

But the men from Perpignan did the unthinkable.

“It’s hard to explain… the French people are so passionate,” Drinkwater adds. “It would be like the Warriors winning the NRL, you can imagine how that place would go.

“When we land in France, the place will be going pretty wild.”
Drinkwater speaks with NSWRL.com.au moments after his side’s 20-14 victory. Standing in the shadows of Wembley’s iconic arch, a world away from the days spent covered in sweat and dirt, or the long sessions at the Magpies’ Concord training base. He’s reminded of the tougher times he endured to achieve Rugby League greatness.

“Rugby League’s a rollercoaster, I just ride it,” Drinkwater says. “I’m very fortunate that I get to do this for a job.

“There’s a lot of people that have been part-time for years, trying to make it. I have a lot of respect for those boys that work all day and play in that (Intrust Super Premiership) back home, because it is tough. I don’t think people appreciate how hard it is and what they sacrifice.

“I’ve been lucky enough to have been full-time for most of my career so it was hard, but it was worth every minute.

“Every hole I dug, it was worth it.”

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Post by Russell » Sat 17 Nov, 2018 9:00 am

Good on him - good to see a bloke who puts in the effort, reap the rewards,

Well done Quadja !

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Post by diedpretty » Sat 17 Nov, 2018 9:11 am

Lauren wrote:
Fri 16 Nov, 2018 10:53 pm
Only just came across ISP highlights abit earlier and Drinkwater was featured a lot. I admit I only watched 3 games with him in the team and didn't realise how fantastic he was. Anyone know what's happening with him?
Also found this story and thought I'd post - though it's probably already been shared on here.


BIGGEST STORIES | #1 - Drinkwater leaves Wests and wins Challenge Cup
Author
Simon Masterton
NSWRL.com.au
Timestamp
Tue 30 Oct 2018, 09:50 AM
Share on social media
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Looking back on the remarkable year that was, NSWRL.com.au counts down the 10 biggest stories from the 2018 Intrust Super Premiership NSW season. At No.1, a part-time Magpies player packs his bags and wins the Challenge Cup in England.

It’s the Rugby League rollercoaster which took Josh Drinkwater from a Western Sydney construction site to Wembley – and etched the humble halfback’s name in the history books.

In the heat of the 2017-18 Australian summer, Drinkwater was at a crossroads in his promising career. Let go by the Leigh Centurions after their 2017 season ended in relegation, the 26-year-old had returned home and had taken up manual labour, with his Rugby League future unclear. The former Holden Cup star, once viewed as a long-term NRL option at the Dragons and then the Tigers, was digging holes to make a living, getting further away from the football field by the minute.

But digging deep is what the resilient No.7 does best, and a call from Western Suburbs Magpies coach Brett Hodgson changed everything.

“It was tough, mate,” Drinkwater tells NSWRL.com.au. “I spent a lot of time just working, I was willing to get back into footy and luckily enough ‘Hodgo’ gave me a call.

“He knew I played over (in England) and he found out I didn’t have a club, so he gave me a call and I haven’t looked back.”
By mid-February, the recently-rebranded Magpies had found the halfback to lead them into their Intrust Super Premiership NSW return. Fans are all too aware of the display which Drinkwater produced in the seven games that followed.

“I was loving my time at the Magpies at the start of the year,” Drinkwater recalls. “‘Hodgo’ was fantastic for me – from my first day I got there I really got a good part-time squad. He really helped me as a player and I’ve got to give him a lot of credit, to be honest.
“It was tough going back to part-time but he made it so enjoyable and I played my best footy under him. I owe him a lot.”

Drinkwater was unquestionably the competition’s best player in the opening two months, scoring 72 points and setting up 11 tries in the Magpies’ five wins. Still digging holes, still commuting from his Central Coast home and backing up a hard day’s work with training, the Terrigal Sharks junior never lost the hunger for success. A hunger which was about to be satisfied in the most extraordinary way.

The in-form playmaker’s phone rang for a second time; it was Steve McNamara. That’s the man who, just months prior, had coached the Catalans Dragons to a devastating Million Pound Game win over Leigh, sending both the Centurions and their halfback packing. The former England boss needed a replacement for retired halfback Luke Walsh, and Drinkwater was his man.

As much as Magpies fans will attest to Drinkwater’s dominance in the season’s early rounds, those in the northern hemisphere will laud his transformation of the Dragons since his April arrival. Struggling to string wins together in the Super League, the Dragons were celebrated as easy opponents when drawn by stronger teams in the Challenge Cup, but gradually rebuilt their reputation. Drinkwater was central to a mid-season turnaround which would soon deliver French Rugby League its proudest moment.

Proving to offer more than nuisance value throughout the course of the knock-out competition, the Dragons shocked many to book a place in the final at Wembley Stadium. Even then, the chances of the Dragons defeating the Warrington Wolves in the decider – and becoming the first non-British side in the tournament’s 122-year history to claim the famous silverware – were considered slim by many.

But the men from Perpignan did the unthinkable.

“It’s hard to explain… the French people are so passionate,” Drinkwater adds. “It would be like the Warriors winning the NRL, you can imagine how that place would go.

“When we land in France, the place will be going pretty wild.”
Drinkwater speaks with NSWRL.com.au moments after his side’s 20-14 victory. Standing in the shadows of Wembley’s iconic arch, a world away from the days spent covered in sweat and dirt, or the long sessions at the Magpies’ Concord training base. He’s reminded of the tougher times he endured to achieve Rugby League greatness.

“Rugby League’s a rollercoaster, I just ride it,” Drinkwater says. “I’m very fortunate that I get to do this for a job.

“There’s a lot of people that have been part-time for years, trying to make it. I have a lot of respect for those boys that work all day and play in that (Intrust Super Premiership) back home, because it is tough. I don’t think people appreciate how hard it is and what they sacrifice.

“I’ve been lucky enough to have been full-time for most of my career so it was hard, but it was worth every minute.

“Every hole I dug, it was worth it.”
He is no longer at Catalan Dragons and from all reports is in limbo at the moment. There are a few ESL clubs interested and WT have first dibs if he moves back to NRL. The problem coming back to the Tigers is he will be in ISP again. Personally i reckon he should try and pick up a 1 year deal ( easier said than done ) in ESL and try and improve his worth for an NRL return.

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Post by momo&medo » Sat 17 Nov, 2018 10:24 am

diedpretty wrote:
Sat 17 Nov, 2018 9:11 am
Lauren wrote:
Fri 16 Nov, 2018 10:53 pm
Only just came across ISP highlights abit earlier and Drinkwater was featured a lot. I admit I only watched 3 games with him in the team and didn't realise how fantastic he was. Anyone know what's happening with him?
Also found this story and thought I'd post - though it's probably already been shared on here.


BIGGEST STORIES | #1 - Drinkwater leaves Wests and wins Challenge Cup
Author
Simon Masterton
NSWRL.com.au
Timestamp
Tue 30 Oct 2018, 09:50 AM
Share on social media
Share via Facebook
Share via Twiiter
Share via Whats-app
Share via Reddit
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Looking back on the remarkable year that was, NSWRL.com.au counts down the 10 biggest stories from the 2018 Intrust Super Premiership NSW season. At No.1, a part-time Magpies player packs his bags and wins the Challenge Cup in England.

It’s the Rugby League rollercoaster which took Josh Drinkwater from a Western Sydney construction site to Wembley – and etched the humble halfback’s name in the history books.

In the heat of the 2017-18 Australian summer, Drinkwater was at a crossroads in his promising career. Let go by the Leigh Centurions after their 2017 season ended in relegation, the 26-year-old had returned home and had taken up manual labour, with his Rugby League future unclear. The former Holden Cup star, once viewed as a long-term NRL option at the Dragons and then the Tigers, was digging holes to make a living, getting further away from the football field by the minute.

But digging deep is what the resilient No.7 does best, and a call from Western Suburbs Magpies coach Brett Hodgson changed everything.

“It was tough, mate,” Drinkwater tells NSWRL.com.au. “I spent a lot of time just working, I was willing to get back into footy and luckily enough ‘Hodgo’ gave me a call.

“He knew I played over (in England) and he found out I didn’t have a club, so he gave me a call and I haven’t looked back.”
By mid-February, the recently-rebranded Magpies had found the halfback to lead them into their Intrust Super Premiership NSW return. Fans are all too aware of the display which Drinkwater produced in the seven games that followed.

“I was loving my time at the Magpies at the start of the year,” Drinkwater recalls. “‘Hodgo’ was fantastic for me – from my first day I got there I really got a good part-time squad. He really helped me as a player and I’ve got to give him a lot of credit, to be honest.
“It was tough going back to part-time but he made it so enjoyable and I played my best footy under him. I owe him a lot.”

Drinkwater was unquestionably the competition’s best player in the opening two months, scoring 72 points and setting up 11 tries in the Magpies’ five wins. Still digging holes, still commuting from his Central Coast home and backing up a hard day’s work with training, the Terrigal Sharks junior never lost the hunger for success. A hunger which was about to be satisfied in the most extraordinary way.

The in-form playmaker’s phone rang for a second time; it was Steve McNamara. That’s the man who, just months prior, had coached the Catalans Dragons to a devastating Million Pound Game win over Leigh, sending both the Centurions and their halfback packing. The former England boss needed a replacement for retired halfback Luke Walsh, and Drinkwater was his man.

As much as Magpies fans will attest to Drinkwater’s dominance in the season’s early rounds, those in the northern hemisphere will laud his transformation of the Dragons since his April arrival. Struggling to string wins together in the Super League, the Dragons were celebrated as easy opponents when drawn by stronger teams in the Challenge Cup, but gradually rebuilt their reputation. Drinkwater was central to a mid-season turnaround which would soon deliver French Rugby League its proudest moment.

Proving to offer more than nuisance value throughout the course of the knock-out competition, the Dragons shocked many to book a place in the final at Wembley Stadium. Even then, the chances of the Dragons defeating the Warrington Wolves in the decider – and becoming the first non-British side in the tournament’s 122-year history to claim the famous silverware – were considered slim by many.

But the men from Perpignan did the unthinkable.

“It’s hard to explain… the French people are so passionate,” Drinkwater adds. “It would be like the Warriors winning the NRL, you can imagine how that place would go.

“When we land in France, the place will be going pretty wild.”
Drinkwater speaks with NSWRL.com.au moments after his side’s 20-14 victory. Standing in the shadows of Wembley’s iconic arch, a world away from the days spent covered in sweat and dirt, or the long sessions at the Magpies’ Concord training base. He’s reminded of the tougher times he endured to achieve Rugby League greatness.

“Rugby League’s a rollercoaster, I just ride it,” Drinkwater says. “I’m very fortunate that I get to do this for a job.

“There’s a lot of people that have been part-time for years, trying to make it. I have a lot of respect for those boys that work all day and play in that (Intrust Super Premiership) back home, because it is tough. I don’t think people appreciate how hard it is and what they sacrifice.

“I’ve been lucky enough to have been full-time for most of my career so it was hard, but it was worth every minute.

“Every hole I dug, it was worth it.”
He is no longer at Catalan Dragons and from all reports is in limbo at the moment. There are a few ESL clubs interested and WT have first dibs if he moves back to NRL. The problem coming back to the Tigers is he will be in ISP again. Personally i reckon he should try and pick up a 1 year deal ( easier said than done ) in ESL and try and improve his worth for an NRL return.
Think we have half's positions covered with Gamble and young development players we have on our books.

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Post by happy tiger » Sat 17 Nov, 2018 11:13 am

momo&medo wrote:
Sat 17 Nov, 2018 10:24 am
diedpretty wrote:
Sat 17 Nov, 2018 9:11 am
Lauren wrote:
Fri 16 Nov, 2018 10:53 pm
Only just came across ISP highlights abit earlier and Drinkwater was featured a lot. I admit I only watched 3 games with him in the team and didn't realise how fantastic he was. Anyone know what's happening with him?
Also found this story and thought I'd post - though it's probably already been shared on here.


BIGGEST STORIES | #1 - Drinkwater leaves Wests and wins Challenge Cup
Author
Simon Masterton
NSWRL.com.au
Timestamp
Tue 30 Oct 2018, 09:50 AM
Share on social media
Share via Facebook
Share via Twiiter
Share via Whats-app
Share via Reddit
Share via Email
Looking back on the remarkable year that was, NSWRL.com.au counts down the 10 biggest stories from the 2018 Intrust Super Premiership NSW season. At No.1, a part-time Magpies player packs his bags and wins the Challenge Cup in England.

It’s the Rugby League rollercoaster which took Josh Drinkwater from a Western Sydney construction site to Wembley – and etched the humble halfback’s name in the history books.

In the heat of the 2017-18 Australian summer, Drinkwater was at a crossroads in his promising career. Let go by the Leigh Centurions after their 2017 season ended in relegation, the 26-year-old had returned home and had taken up manual labour, with his Rugby League future unclear. The former Holden Cup star, once viewed as a long-term NRL option at the Dragons and then the Tigers, was digging holes to make a living, getting further away from the football field by the minute.

But digging deep is what the resilient No.7 does best, and a call from Western Suburbs Magpies coach Brett Hodgson changed everything.

“It was tough, mate,” Drinkwater tells NSWRL.com.au. “I spent a lot of time just working, I was willing to get back into footy and luckily enough ‘Hodgo’ gave me a call.

“He knew I played over (in England) and he found out I didn’t have a club, so he gave me a call and I haven’t looked back.”
By mid-February, the recently-rebranded Magpies had found the halfback to lead them into their Intrust Super Premiership NSW return. Fans are all too aware of the display which Drinkwater produced in the seven games that followed.

“I was loving my time at the Magpies at the start of the year,” Drinkwater recalls. “‘Hodgo’ was fantastic for me – from my first day I got there I really got a good part-time squad. He really helped me as a player and I’ve got to give him a lot of credit, to be honest.
“It was tough going back to part-time but he made it so enjoyable and I played my best footy under him. I owe him a lot.”

Drinkwater was unquestionably the competition’s best player in the opening two months, scoring 72 points and setting up 11 tries in the Magpies’ five wins. Still digging holes, still commuting from his Central Coast home and backing up a hard day’s work with training, the Terrigal Sharks junior never lost the hunger for success. A hunger which was about to be satisfied in the most extraordinary way.

The in-form playmaker’s phone rang for a second time; it was Steve McNamara. That’s the man who, just months prior, had coached the Catalans Dragons to a devastating Million Pound Game win over Leigh, sending both the Centurions and their halfback packing. The former England boss needed a replacement for retired halfback Luke Walsh, and Drinkwater was his man.

As much as Magpies fans will attest to Drinkwater’s dominance in the season’s early rounds, those in the northern hemisphere will laud his transformation of the Dragons since his April arrival. Struggling to string wins together in the Super League, the Dragons were celebrated as easy opponents when drawn by stronger teams in the Challenge Cup, but gradually rebuilt their reputation. Drinkwater was central to a mid-season turnaround which would soon deliver French Rugby League its proudest moment.

Proving to offer more than nuisance value throughout the course of the knock-out competition, the Dragons shocked many to book a place in the final at Wembley Stadium. Even then, the chances of the Dragons defeating the Warrington Wolves in the decider – and becoming the first non-British side in the tournament’s 122-year history to claim the famous silverware – were considered slim by many.

But the men from Perpignan did the unthinkable.

“It’s hard to explain… the French people are so passionate,” Drinkwater adds. “It would be like the Warriors winning the NRL, you can imagine how that place would go.

“When we land in France, the place will be going pretty wild.”
Drinkwater speaks with NSWRL.com.au moments after his side’s 20-14 victory. Standing in the shadows of Wembley’s iconic arch, a world away from the days spent covered in sweat and dirt, or the long sessions at the Magpies’ Concord training base. He’s reminded of the tougher times he endured to achieve Rugby League greatness.

“Rugby League’s a rollercoaster, I just ride it,” Drinkwater says. “I’m very fortunate that I get to do this for a job.

“There’s a lot of people that have been part-time for years, trying to make it. I have a lot of respect for those boys that work all day and play in that (Intrust Super Premiership) back home, because it is tough. I don’t think people appreciate how hard it is and what they sacrifice.

“I’ve been lucky enough to have been full-time for most of my career so it was hard, but it was worth every minute.

“Every hole I dug, it was worth it.”
He is no longer at Catalan Dragons and from all reports is in limbo at the moment. There are a few ESL clubs interested and WT have first dibs if he moves back to NRL. The problem coming back to the Tigers is he will be in ISP again. Personally i reckon he should try and pick up a 1 year deal ( easier said than done ) in ESL and try and improve his worth for an NRL return.
Think we have half's positions covered with Gamble and young development players we have on our books.
its a no brainer if it is down to Quadja or Gamble for me

Quadja all the way thanks and twice on Sundays

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Post by Lauren » Sat 17 Nov, 2018 2:18 pm

Thanks guys. Though I think he's actually a really good player and wish him all the best, I'm more interested in whether Madge manages to offload players and/or fill the vacant spots left by Sue and Grant.

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Post by innsaneink » Sat 17 Nov, 2018 10:06 pm

Bring Hoppa back...he aint changed

Image

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Post by TheDaBoss » Sun 18 Nov, 2018 3:41 pm

innsaneink wrote:
Sat 17 Nov, 2018 10:06 pm
Bring Hoppa back...he aint changed

Image
he is certainly having a crack at it
:sign: + :deadhorse: = Ivan in a nutshell

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Post by happy tiger » Sun 18 Nov, 2018 5:17 pm

Haven't we brought enough players back

If they have left , they left because they didn't want to be here or we didn't want them anymore

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Post by TheDaBoss » Sun 18 Nov, 2018 9:11 pm

we can definitely bring back moses, and i think a majority of the forums will agree with me


:roll :bash
:sign: + :deadhorse: = Ivan in a nutshell

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Post by happy tiger » Sun 18 Nov, 2018 11:15 pm

TheDaBoss wrote:
Sun 18 Nov, 2018 9:11 pm
we can definitely bring back moses, and i think a majority of the forums will agree with me


:roll :bash
Moses Mbye hasn't left :crazy ;)

Russell
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Post by Russell » Mon 19 Nov, 2018 8:06 am

TheDaBoss wrote:
Sun 18 Nov, 2018 9:11 pm
we can definitely bring back moses, and i think a majority of the forums will agree with me


:roll :bash
Don't think so - this is now a princess Tanker free zone.

By the way give it a rest - it ain't funny.

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Harvey
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Post by Harvey » Mon 19 Nov, 2018 8:27 am

If reports that we are looking at Levi are true, we should bring back Manaia

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