The Reverse Touch Finder

What’s the general consensus on the reverse touch finder? do we seem to do it to often? Do you sometimes scream out to take the quick tap? do you feel our forwards could assert some dominance in the “red zone”? I know it has it’s place for a wide attacking play, but is it the “go to option” every week?

I’d prefer it if they take a tap, rather than lose ground

It does look a little pointless when from the tap we take a settler but I’m sure there is method to their madness.

I recall that Andrew Voss used to point out that they were better off just walking the ball back because the defense line has to remain 10 metres from where the penalty. I wonder whether Sheens and Farah know this?

Just another one of those pointless procedures in rugby league, you know? Just like scrums.

My understanding is that Robbie kicks for touch so that the restart is always 10m in and they can run their set plays from that spot. Given that he is usually doing this from 5-10m out anyway, it really doesn’t give the defence an advantage.

I am of the belief that a tap can be taken anywhere in line with and up to the mark, much like a conversion. But I’ve never actually seen the rules stated as such. It may in fact be that it can only be taken on the mark itself.

As joebob points out they normally just hit it straight back up to where the penalty was originally anyway!!

robbie kicks out to to the 20 m line because apparently they have set plays from 20 m. i rem one of the commentator’s pointing it out.

@tig_prmz:

robbie kicks out to to the 20 m line because apparently they have set plays from 20 m. i rem one of the commentator’s pointing it out.

Which would be fine if there was actually a set play but invariably some forward just takes a hit up. I’m sure you could easily accomplish your goals by taking the tap. I’d say it is more a mental thing - get yourselves set and start from the same spot every time.

Gives them a bit more space to run onto the ball and also keeps the defence moving forward and back rather then just camping out on their try line only metres from the play the ball.

They use it for set plays but generally later in the set rather then the first play.

who cares if you dont score within the set your going to be 10m from the tryline regardless

@Yossarian:

@tig_prmz:

robbie kicks out to to the 20 m line because apparently they have set plays from 20 m. i rem one of the commentator’s pointing it out.

Which would be fine if there was actually a set play but invariably some forward just takes a hit up. I’m sure you could easily accomplish your goals by taking the tap. I’d say it is more a mental thing - get yourselves set and start from the same spot every time.

ye probs a mental thing then. i remember last year when we got three or more consecutive penalties in the opposition territory. the ref joked: “kick it as back as you want robbie” 😆

they probably just practice starting sets on the 20 at training more than on the goal line…

agree the first hit up ends up at the same position as the penalty more times than not but it’s probs just a mental thing. it also means the defense can’t be as organised if they have a couple of players in the tackle

I don’t get it, they could just walk back on the mark. I remember the Dogs game at Cambo last yr, Robbie deadset kicked it 20 m backwards from the goal line to the 20 m line

@The Tooth:

Gives them a bit more space to run onto the ball and also keeps the defence moving forward and back rather then just camping out on their try line only metres from the play the ball.

They use it for set plays but generally later in the set rather then the first play.

I reckon this would be close to it, try to get a quick PTB on the first tackle and target a retreating defence.

I thinks it more about being controlled, a quick tap and dash often leads to a turn over or dumb option. Where kick back get your calls and structures in place and start again seems a smarter move, although their are times when the quick tap and dash is the better option

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