The National Anthem



  • @DieHarder said in The National Anthem:

    @weststigers and no, we really don’t. As @cochise and I have covered things in depth, to the extent you CAN speak on somebody’s behalf, whereas you’re comparatively vague

    Haha…ok mate



  • @weststigers said in The National Anthem:

    @DieHarder said in The National Anthem:

    @weststigers now that’s not much of a yarn, but alright good chat mate… believe u said it

    @OzLuke said his mate gets the benefit. Not me.

    Yup I said it, and i have discussed this topic with my mate and he agrees. He shouldn’t get it because he can support his family, but he still gets it regardless and, also like I’ve said before, good luck to him for getting whatever he can. Just the debate of the only reason he gets it is because he’s Indigenous…I don’t because I’m Anglo Saxon…

    I do believe he sings the Anthem…



  • @weststigers What I am saying is that yes there is a place for means testing but certain initiatives such as initiatives related to the Close the Gap strategy need to be universal as the problems really are that large. If a few people get a benefit that could have done without it, then really what does it matter as long as this important issue is addressed. I don’t really care either if some people get upset and think its unfair, because our indigenous people had the Australian Government actively trying to eradicate them, not 200 years ago, not 100 years ago within the last 50 years! I’m glad they were able to overcome that and I don’t begrudge anything they receive.



  • Some very interesting opinions here. Is the suggestion that if my partner was indigenous, then any offspring we produced would be more likely to come to the attention of law enforcement, less likely to complete any education, more likely to face unemployment and have poor oral hygiene and dental issues?



  • @Harvey Statistically speaking yes!







  • @Properossi Thanks for the stats!


  • Banned

    @Properossi suicide stats are shocking.



  • @Dan_Blanco Yes truly alarming, I think I read somewhere that a couple of years ago indigenous people were involved in 80% of youth suicides in Australia!



  • Here it is!

    “In 2015, the Indigenous suicide rate was double that of the general population.[8]Indigenous suicide increased from 5% of total Australian suicide in 1991, to 50% in 2010, despite Indigenous people making up only 3% of the total Australian population. The most drastic increase occurred among young people 10-24 years old, where Indigenous youth suicide rose from 10% in 1991 to 80% in 2010. [9]”


  • Banned



  • @cochise said in The National Anthem:

    @weststigers What I am saying is that yes there is a place for means testing but certain initiatives such as initiatives related to the Close the Gap strategy need to be universal as the problems really are that large. If a few people get a benefit that could have done without it, then really what does it matter as long as this important issue is addressed. I don’t really care either if some people get upset and think its unfair, because our indigenous people had the Australian Government actively trying to eradicate them, not 200 years ago, not 100 years ago within the last 50 years! I’m glad they were able to overcome that and I don’t begrudge anything they receive.

    If you’re talking about the Stolen Generation, it was either mixed-race or “at-risk” children that were targeted based on misguided views at the time that they were doing the right thing by the children.

    Some children were taken for the same reason DOCS would take a child now, and others for misguided reasons. This was not a policy of “eradication”. In fact, more Aboriginal children are taken into state or foster care now than under the “Stolen Generation”. White single mothers also had their babies stolen under forced adoption policies between the 1950s and the 1980s. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Forced_adoption_in_Australia

    The child protection policies of the time were not exactly the most advanced.

    Look…in a sensitive topic like this, it’s important to be balanced and correct in your narrative and offer the full story. You’ve obviously been taught a one-sided narrative that equates to white people are racist, violent and bad and black people are tolerant, peaceful and good.

    The truth is, the government of the time was on some moral crusade to protect everyone and made some serious mistakes.

    The balance to this argument is this:

    1. Many Aboriginal children were being abused in their own homes and were put into State care.
    2. Many Aboriginal children were NOT being abused in their own homes and were put into State care incorrectly.
    3. Many mixed-race children were not being abused and were put into state care under misguided assumptions of an “assimilation” policy
    4. Single WHITE mothers were forced to give up children for adoption

    Where’s the welfare for the white kids that were stolen from their mothers? I guess this tragedy doesn’t matter as much because their white privilege makes it “equitable”?



  • @weststigers I’ve actually researched this quite a bit and spent a bit of time on the Report of the National Inquiry into the Stolen Generation which concluded that

    “indigenous families and communities have endured gross violations of their human rights. These violations continue to affect indigenous people’s daily lives. They were an act of genocide, aimed at wiping out indigenous families, communities, and cultures, vital to the precious and inalienable heritage of Australia”

    But to be honest that is a small part of what I’m saying. What I am focusing on is the inequalities between indigenous and non indigenous people in these areas

    shorter life expectancy
    higher rates of infant mortality
    poorer health
    lower levels of education and employment
    higher rates of incarceration
    

    This is what initiatives such as the close the gap strategy are trying to improve and these are vital!



  • @cochise I’ve been watching the conversation on this topic progress and some replies on the topic are a little strange.

    I am a proud Wakka Wakka man and an Aboriginal business owner.

    We focus on increasing Aboriginal participation across all industries among many other things.

    Recently we have helped a few young fellas get jobs in the construction industry in drafting and construction.

    With the support of employers we can help these fellas build a future.

    By providing awareness of the past it helps overcome barriers.

    We have:

    • high incarceration rates
    • high mortality rates
    • lower life expectancy
    • loss of culture and language
    • a large number of kids in care
    • higher unemployment rates
    • lower education outcomes
      And many more

    Aboriginal people are the oldest living culture on earth which nearly came to an end a little over two hundred years ago so much has changed since then.

    Aboriginal people have been here for up to 80,000 years potentially 120,000 years

    It’s amazing so many people don’t know about Aboriginal history and when they do it changes their perceptions of Aboriginal people and their culture and they appreciate it.

    If an Aboriginal person can get a job that can change their lives their families and a whole community.


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