The National Anthem



  • @Geo said in The National Anthem:

    Didn’t you once play Keyboards for Ice House ?


  • Banned

    Can’t tell whether its shame, ignorance or pride that’s stopping some you from understanding our history, period.



  • For those of you that would like to know more please see the link http://www.shareourpride.org.au/



  • @mike said in The National Anthem:

    @happy_tiger said in The National Anthem:

    @Cultured_Bogan said in The National Anthem:

    @Abraham said in The National Anthem:

    My main issue with the Anthem is that is deadly boring.

    In part because we don’t have a history of triumph and conquer like the Brits, or of fighting against the odds to take our freedom by force, like the Americans. So we can’t really produce an anthem that’s inspiring or gives you goose bumps like others do.

    We are the former convict colony that still salutes the queen. Its hard to come up with an inspiring ballad to embody that sort of uneventful history.

    Khe Sanh?

    (Yes, I am kidding.)

    Must admit the national anthem that stirs me when I hear it is La Marseillaise

    But when I see all the surrenders by the French over the years it makes me wonder

    Love is all you need…

    Peace out brother



  • @Properossi
    Fancy website but can’t agree with every view put forward unfortunately.



  • @cochise said in The National Anthem:

    The injustices didn’t only occur 200 years ago! Terrible things were still happening less than 50 years ago!

    Yeah, I am 53 years old, which may be old to some, but to put it in perspective, the HK Holden, being the first of the more square and rectangular shaped era cars, were made and released here that year. That is not ancient history, rather a time when my parents and their peers were very much in control of what occurred, not some convicts and their masters of centuries prior.

    Not only was first contact, yes, first contact with the developed world still made during my lifetime, others that had long met those that now controlled their lands were still living with the hangover from our own apartheid system. My father could not watch a movie with any of his friends of various shades, other than white of course, is just one example. Of course, normal everyday things like public toilets and drinking bubblers were also subject to segregation.

    Being told by adults not to play with the darkies or boongs when growing up in a town and it’s surrounds has never sat well with me. Trouble is a lot of their kids felt the same way and they are the parents and young grandparents of today’s young, and many likely to still be espousing similar values.

    I have watched indigenous Australians in general, being treated differently than others my whole life. Sure, there are the stereotypical stories such as ripping up the floor etc for firewood, that I have witnessed, but such things pale in comparison to the injustice still being dished out today in the form of racism. Thing is that I see it as so much more prevalent again in my Anglo dominated area of two plus years now, than I have seen in the evolving multicultural environment lived in since my teens.

    I have no issue whatsoever with them singing the anthem or not, whatever the reason and regardless of what uniform, if any, they are wearing.



  • @formerguest Great post mate! People keep saying that indigenous people are playing the victim card over events from 200 years ago. I don’t understand how people don’t get that these things happened much more recent than that!



  • @cktiger lots of things come across fancy and sometimes if I don’t understand them I view them to be of poor quality too



  • @formerguest said in The National Anthem:

    @cochise said in The National Anthem:

    The injustices didn’t only occur 200 years ago! Terrible things were still happening less than 50 years ago!

    Yeah, I am 53 years old, which may be old to some, but to put it in perspective, the HK Holden, being the first of the more square and rectangular shaped era cars, were made and released here that year. That is not ancient history, rather a time when my parents and their peers were very much in control of what occurred, not some convicts and their masters of centuries prior.

    Not only was first contact, yes, first contact with the developed world still made during my lifetime, others that had long met those that now controlled their lands were still living with the hangover from our own apartheid system. My father could not watch a movie with any of his friends of various shades, other than white of course, is just one example. Of course, normal everyday things like public toilets and drinking bubblers were also subject to segregation.

    Being told by adults not to play with the darkies or boongs when growing up in a town and it’s surrounds has never sat well with me. Trouble is a lot of their kids felt the same way and they are the parents and young grandparents of today’s young, and many likely to still be espousing similar values.

    I have watched indigenous Australians in general, being treated differently than others my whole life. Sure, there are the stereotypical stories such as ripping up the floor etc for firewood, that I have witnessed, but such things pale in comparison to the injustice still being dished out today in the form of racism. Thing is that I see it as so much more prevalent again in my Anglo dominated area of two plus years now, than I have seen in the evolving multicultural environment lived in since my teens.

    I have no issue whatsoever with them singing the anthem or not, whatever the reason and regardless of what uniform, if any, they are wearing.

    53 years ago and the indigenous couldn’t vote , weren’t recognized as human beings

    52 years ago the Indigenous didn’t have to paid in wages …you could still pay them in food items etc

    52 years ago on average earned 1 pound 3 shillings less for doing the same role someone who was non indigenous

    And when you look at the Wave Hill strike …the property they worked at was British owned

    You know our ancestors in many cases saw the actions of the Indigenous as almost barbaric …I wonder what the Indigenous saw with many of our actions



  • South African cricketers black and white not too keen on their anthem judging by stony silence at the World Cup just now.



  • @Don_Kershane said in The National Anthem:

    South African cricketers black and white not too keen on their anthem judging by stony silence at the World Cup just now.

    Might have something to do with with their form



  • sporting events didn’t always have the national anthem as a pre game event.it became a common occurence during the eighties.ironically people didn’t necessarily know the words to the anthem.they do now.

    sometimes I don’t want to sing the national anthem as its pitched too high.also the person singing is probably doing a good job.i do stand respectfully ,though.
    we stand and listen respectfully when other countries anthems are being played,as you should.
    if you don’t want to sing ,fine.just be respectful- it will be over soon and the game of footy can start.
    I don’t think its an issue to divide people.



  • What if someone sat for the welcome to country?



  • @the_third said in The National Anthem:

    What if someone sat for the welcome to country?

    Sore legs?



  • @TheDaBoss haha. Yeah nah.

    I’m sure you got the point but if someone didn’t partake in welcome to country or doesn’t sing the anthem, what’s the difference?


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