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El corazon es debil, pero el alma es fuerte.

Here's another pack of low-grade morons who ought to be locked into portable toilets and set on fire…

About me
A slow descent into insanity.
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posted in National Rugby League read more

@tig_prmz said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

@jirskyr said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

@tig_prmz said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

The medications for the diseases you described are a necessity to help them live, the risk taken is huge but the benefit is huge too.
COVID on the other hand, the virus itself we haven’t been able to decode the DNA of it properly. We don’t know the long term implications on those who even have the virus. Compare that to DPT, small pox etc where the death rates were astronomical. The disease HAD to be stopped, whereas with COVID, the biggest issue is the economical impact as death rates are minuscule.
As for making COVID vaccine compulsory, I’d say that I’d be happy for people to have a choice whether they want to be injected with it or not. Those who choose to (like myself) are choosing so that I don’t infect other and don’t get infected myself. If you’re worried about catching it, then get the vaccine. It shouldn’t be up to the person next to you to get vaccinated.
I am happy with a health discussion and you seem to have a much better experience than I but at the end, I’m just trying to use common sense and understand people’s rights and apprehensions. The disease itself isn’t even 1 year, what if 5 years down the track those who have had the disease previously develop some type of demyelination or neuropathic disorders that we didn’t know of? All of it needs to be taken into consideration before vaccines are made “compulsory”.

A democratic government should not make a vaccine compulsory, it’s unethical. But they can heavily incentivise the shot.

I expect, initially, that non-vaccination will mean you cannot travel internationally. Eventually however there might be a fairly significant social stigma associated with not being vaccinated, because of how damaging the pandemic is. This may also apply to schools, businesses, day care etc., where they cannot take the risk that non-vaccinated folks bring disease cases into their institution.

I think you undersell the seriousness of COVID as a condition. You are firstly correct that we don’t know long-term outcomes of having the disease and it may have later significant impact on quality of life and ultimate mortality. The death rate is modest, yes, but when the entire human population is disease naive 12 months ago, even 1% death rate is a staggering destructive outcome - you are talking 70M deaths in however many years it takes the entire population to become exposed.

In the US alone, COVID-related deaths have eclipsed many very damaging national events such as WWI, Vietnam, Korean wars. COVID-related deaths have almost matched total combat deaths from WWII, which is horrendous to contemplate, given that WWII was so destructive and still it took 4 years to rack up that combat tally.

So I feel ultimately the risk in non-vaccination for COVID is huge. Not at a personal level, but at a global level. You can’t catch cancer or heart disease, so those are individual challenges.

In terms of COVID - related deaths, I feel those people have had several co-morbidities anyway and I’d be keen to look at the data of the amount of people passing away each year from normal flu vs COVID.

Just thinking out loud here but maybe those at risk such as the elderly, COPD patients and the immuno suppressent patients, the vaccine could be heavily recommended to them so the chances of them catching it are reduced rather than the other 90% of the population for which the symptoms are that of a serious flu. They have more to gain from the vaccine than the otherwise healthy.

And then once we know more and more in the next 5 or 6 years, the use can becomes widespread.

I don’t agree with putting the onus on those that have less to lose than those that have more to lose.

According to the CDC, influenza killed around 34,200 people in 2018-2019 flu season.

The CDC classifies the flu season as the start of autumn, so from the 1st September 190,000 deaths had already been racked up by COVID in the United States. Another 3 months later (start of winter,) it’s at 276,000 and as of today some 5.4 million people are infected and beds are maxed out in heavy hit areas.

Why is the co-mordbity argument always dredged up? No one is debating this. It’s no different for the flu or any other disease that predates on comorbidities. The fact is that the influenza in the same flu season period had an estimated death rate of 0.1% (based on a reported 35.5m infections.) currently the COVID death rate versus total infections is at 1.96% (276,000 deaths versus a reported 14,108,000 infections.) COVID has a higher mortality rate of a factor of almost 20.

And you’re assuming that those people with co-morbidities like the immunosuppressed & COPD patients etc are able to have the vaccine. What if they can’t?

posted in Wests Tigers Discussion read more

@jirskyr said in Ask the Boss ep1:

@Cultured_Bogan said in Ask the Boss ep1:

@jirskyr said in Ask the Boss ep1:

@Cultured_Bogan said in Ask the Boss ep1:

Is there a vision to have one home ground in the near future?

Recruitment decisions made since seasons end look to have been financially smart, with financial risk far outweighed by potential reward. Are recruitment decisions undertaken by a panel now to avoid issues with short term panic buys (i.e. Cleary’s power spending which has crippled the club.)

I can answer these.

(1) Is potentially yes, but everything now is dependent on the government’s revised stadia strategy post-COVID. Originally the club was told to expect the Homebush refurb, which has now been canned.

(3) Yes there is a recruitment panel. Everyone gets a say, nobody has final say.

Cheers Justin.

Oh you want to hear it from the man himself, even if you kind of know the answer?

It was a light hearted jab mate, I wasn’t being serious.

posted in National Rugby League read more

@jirskyr said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

@mike said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

@jirskyr said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

@Hangonaminute said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

@jirskyr said in CORONAVIRUS VACCINATIONS:

There will be two types of vaxxers in the next few years: those that accept the vaccine and those that only want domestic holidays.

I won’t be leaving the country then, I’m no anti vaxer but I won’t be getting a jab until the teething problems are over.

What teething problems specifically?

Don’t encourage him

Well the thing is to understand those concerns, potentially address or dispel them.

Delaying vaccination, I don’t know if folks understand that impacts the concept of how vaccinations work in the community. It’s no good for folks to pick and choose for highly infectious disease, because a significant part of vaccination is not just prevention, but ultimately dampening down of total population caseload.

So if half of all folks decide they want to “wait and see” for some specific reason, then that’s half the population with ZERO protection against COVID and half the population for it to catch fire within.

Perhaps we need to go back 200 years when there were no vaccinations at all, and no antibiotics, and give folks another lesson in the destructive power of communicable disease in large well-connected populations.

Make Smallpox Great Again.

posted in Wests Tigers Discussion read more

@jirskyr said in Ask the Boss ep1:

@Cultured_Bogan said in Ask the Boss ep1:

Is there a vision to have one home ground in the near future?

Recruitment decisions made since seasons end look to have been financially smart, with financial risk far outweighed by potential reward. Are recruitment decisions undertaken by a panel now to avoid issues with short term panic buys (i.e. Cleary’s power spending which has crippled the club.)

I can answer these.

(1) Is potentially yes, but everything now is dependent on the government’s revised stadia strategy post-COVID. Originally the club was told to expect the Homebush refurb, which has now been canned.

(3) Yes there is a recruitment panel. Everyone gets a say, nobody has final say.

Cheers Justin.

posted in Contracts read more

@JC99 said in David Nofoaluma:

$450k is pretty reasonable… I thought he was on around that already

Yeah I think it was reported like $400K (if that even is indeed true.)

He was certainly overvalued last time around.

posted in Contracts read more

Good luck with that. Cream of the crop wingers would be lucky to get 500K.

Depends how the club value him, but I would seriously think that we would get nowhere near that given we have quite a few outside backs.

posted in General Discussion read more

@Geo said in Politics Super Thread - keep it all in here:

China put up a wall to keep the Mongsls out…no one batted an eye

That’s because it was useless lol.

posted in General Discussion read more

@happy_tiger said in Politics Super Thread - keep it all in here:

If I was an exporter at the moment I’d be nervous …we need China far more than China needs us

Time for glorious Juche, comrade!

posted in General Discussion read more

@TillLindemann said in Politics Super Thread - keep it all in here:

Getting a bit over China’s trade war against us.

I’ll be buying a few Australian wines today to support the local industry. They’ve had repeated blows - bushfire, drought, and now Chinese bullying.

Shouldn’t be too worried about the tariffs on wine. There’s enough Chinese here buying from the cellar door.

posted in Wests Tigers Discussion read more
  1. Is there a vision to have one home ground in the near future?
  2. After the recent contract issues with Matterson & Aloiai, does the club have, or plan to implement, an engagement process in place to avoid or mitigate the damage of these nasty disputes in future?
  3. Recruitment decisions made since seasons end look to have been financially smart, with financial risk far outweighed by potential reward. Are recruitment decisions undertaken by a panel now to avoid issues with short term panic buys (i.e. Cleary’s power spending which has crippled the club.)
  4. Is the club looking to make junior pathways stronger. For a club with a fairly large junior base we are not seeing many juniors graduates compared to a club like the Panthers.